Brazil

Entry requirements (Visa)
Accommodation / Camping
Traveling with a dog
Traveling by bike
Country / People
Food

Paraguay

Entry requirements (Visa)
Accommodation / Camping
Traveling with a dog
Traveling by bike
Country / People
Food

Argentina

Entry requirements (Visa)
90 days tourist visa stamped at the border.
Accommodation / Camping
We never stayed in hotels in Argentina because there are plenty of campings which are way cheaper and generally offer a good service (hot shower, electricity and bbq). Depending the region and if it’s a private or public camping : prices for a tent are going from 3€ to 15€ per night. Argentina is a huge country were most of the population is concentrated in very few cities. As the rest of the country is almost unoccupied, it’s very easy to to find a spot to pitch the tent.
Traveling with a dog
The vast majority of the campings don’t have any problem with dogs. There are stray dogs everywhere so it’s hard to forbid the entrance to a place when there are ten dogs in already.
The only places where we couldn’t go are national parks. We couldn’t visit the Perito Moreno glacier nor the mount Fitz Roy with Iba. Dogs are not allowed to preserve biodiversity and be sure they won’t scare wild animals. Funnily we had the rare change to observe two huemules (kind of deer) when we sneaked in the national park on the way to the Chilean border. We didn’t meet nobody who had seen them. The huemules were interested in Iba’s presence and just stayed there looking at us for a long time. Beside that, 4×4 driving very fast are totally allowed in the park. Who knows what the most dangerous for biodiversity.
The border police is very strict with animal importation. All vaccinations, the health certificate and the importation permit need to be up to date to be able to go through any border from Argentina.
Traveling by bike
Argentina is really flat.The biggest challenges are the road conditions, long distance between villages and the a very strong wind in some areas. Portions of main roads (like the RN40) are still not paved in the west of the country and can be in a very bad shape. The distance between two civilized point can go over 100 km so it happened we had to carry over 10 liters of water. In case of emergency, you will always cross a truck or find an isolated house to fill your bottles. If you go to Patagonia, be prepared to affront its well famous wind. One day, we couldn’t go over 6 km per hour on flat ground pedalling with all the strength we had.
Country / People
Food
As a restaurant meal cost around 10$, we generally cooked our own food. You will be able to find tasty blue cheese (french people need cheese to survive) and beaf in most of the country. If you pass by cities you will find empanadas, fresh pastas and cheese pizzas for reasonable price.

Uruguay

Entry requirements (Visa)
Accommodation / Camping
Traveling with a dog
Traveling by bike
Country / People
Food

Chile

Entry requirements (Visa)
90 days tourist visa stamped at the border.
Accommodation / Camping
You can find a basic hotel room from 15€ to 40€ almost everywhere. Campings are cheaper and offer a good service but keep in mind people party a lot in there during weekends and holidays. Patagonia delivers very nice wild camping spots : drinkable water from the river (where you can fish salmons from), forests and places free of humans.
Traveling with a dog
There are plenty of stray dogs in the street but they generally behave well. As always, the problem comes from guards dogs which are born to kill what is passing by.
It’s not always easy to find an hotel allowing dogs but we never had problems in campings. Chilean borders are the most restrictives. You cannot bring vegetables, fruits or cheese through the border and pet importation is very strict. You won’t be able to cross the border with your dog if you don’t have all the vaccination up to date and the exportation permit from the SAG (or the equivalent of the neighbour countries). Iba was the first animal ever crossing the Argentinian / Chilean border at El Chalten and it’s nothing to say they were hard to convince to let us pass. Argentinian guard were as tough as Chilean one for dog importation.
Traveling by bike
The main roads are nicely asphalted but the other ones are generally not, and in a pretty bad shape. Chile is relatively flat South of Santiago. Yes you’ll need to cross the andes to go to Argentina but you’ll just have to climb one or two passes, no more.
Country / People
Food
We mostly cooked our own meals in Chile because restaurants are quite expensive.
It will be hard to find a meal for less than 8 or 10$ in South Chili. Meals are mainly composed of beef or seafood with rice and fries. Vegetables and fresh food are very rare in Patagonia as everything is imported by truck on the small mountainous gravel roads. On the rest of the country, you will find a large variety of groceries in any shops. Try the the lamb cooked on a cross if you have a chance, it’s delicious!

Bolivia

Entry requirements (Visa)
30 days tourist visa stamped at the border. We overpassed it of 2 days and needed to pay a 10$ fee each at the border.
Accommodation / Camping
You can find hotels in cities but tourism is not very developed in villages (in exception of very touristic spots like the salar Uyuni). You can get a basic room from 4€ to 15€.
The altiplano of Bolivia is mostly inhabited. Even if trees are almost inexistent, we found nice hidden camping spots. But be prepared for freezing nights! (it went down to -12 degrees)
Water is really rare on the altiplano. People get water one hour a day in the afternoon and fill up big plastic tanks. All the pipes and tanks freeze at night until late in the morning. You can imagine we had doubts about water quality so we used to add one or two drops (or pills) of chlorine in case it would have been contaminated.
Traveling with a dog
Everything was fine with a dog in Bolivia. No hate, no love from the locals but something like “I don’t care”.
We easily found an hotel room in Tupiza and El Alto but we really struggled in Oruro. We camped most of the time because we stayed in countryside.
Taking the train from Tupiza to Uyuni wasn’t a problem at all. Iba stayed in the luggage car with the bicycle for a simple additional fee.
No problem at the Argentinian / Bolivian and Bolivian / Peruvian border. We might have been lucky at the Argentinian border because the the guys from SENASA (animal and agricultural importation) were off for a nap or lunch break so nobody checked Iba’s importation permit. But we are sure there is always a way to make the dog cross without an importation permit. That border is not controlled at all and most of the people pass 50 meters away in the river without checking any passport… For the Peruvian border the guards didn’t care about the dog. So no need to follow the complicated and expensive requirements to cross the border with a dog. Save money and time!
Traveling by bike
Bolivian altiplano is very flat. Some areas like the salar Uyuni have a strong Ouest to Est wind but some days are calmer (we waited one day more in an hotel before crossing the salar to have the best conditions). We didn’t really feel altitude sickness maybe because the way up to go to 4000 meters took us various days long to climb so we might had time to acclimate. The main road were asphalted few years ago and are in a very good condition. There is a very comfortable emergency lane you can drive on with your bike without being bothered. Traffic is crazy around La Paz / El Alto so be prepared! Secondary roads can be the worst ones you have ever seen in your life : either full of sand or rocks. But that’s the price to get to the incredible Bolivian scenery.
Country / People
Everybody on the road was saying hello with a big smile. We met really nice and generous people who opened their door to us. Bolivia was the South American country with the strongest cultural identity we have seen. There are still lots of indigenous communities with their languages and traditions. It’s maybe why we felt the locals a bit reserved. We can totally understand as we look like aliens coming from far far away with our tandem bike and a dog.
Food
Simple but good 2 meal course in countryside for less than 3$ : a stock or stew for starter and some rice / quinoa, potatoes, lentils/beans with fried chicken / lama for the main.

Peru

Entry requirements (Visa)
90 days tourist visa stamped at the border.
Accommodation / Camping
You can find a basic hotel room from 4€ to 15€ almost everywhere.
Most of the land is used by small farmers and we rarely found areas free of humans. But locals are very happy to let you pitch your tent on their land if you ask. Water is relatively clean, we used to add one or two drops (or pills) of chlorine in case it would have been contaminated.
Traveling with a dog
People love dogs in Peru.
Like in Ecuador and Colombia, at least one person per day was trying to convince us to gift or sell Iba to them…
The very positive point is that almost all hotels accept dogs. It’s maybe a bit more complicated in touristic places like Cusco or Lima but you always gonna find something.
Iba was violently attacked two or three time in the very far country side. Dogs seem to be more trained to attack in these areas.
Dogs are not allowed in Matchu Pitchu but, if you want to visit nice Inca ruins, you can go to Choquequirao with your dog which is as big as Matchu Pitchu but not as crawled by tourists.
Small bus companies accept to take dogs in the hold if you pay a small extra. But be prepared for a crazy roller-coaster drive!
No problem at the Bolivian / Peruvian and Peruvian / Ecuadorian border with Iba. The guards even asked us if it was our dog, we replied “yes” but they never asked for the needed exportation permit or health certificate. So no need to follow the complicated and expensive requirements to cross the border with a dog. Save money and time!
Traveling by bike
Peru is a huge country with lots of mountains. You will need to get used to go from 2000m to 4000m to 2000m to 4000m… Two days to climb, one hour to go down. Be prepared to suffer! But that’s the price to see wonderful landscapes from the desertic coast to the freezing mountains passing by the tropical diversity. Most of the roads are nicely asphalted, the dirt roads are generally in good shape. Slopes are reasonably leveled when asphalted and a bit more arch on dirt roads.
Country / People
Peruvians are very nice, welcoming and helpful. Especially in the Northern half of the country were we got invited plenty of time with an incredible generosity. On another side, we felt a strong racism against the “gringos”. At the beginning we were taking with the smile when 50 school kids were yelling GRINGOS at us. But after 3 months it really started to bother us.
Food
Simple but good 2 meal course in countryside for less than 3$ : a stock or stew for starter and some rice, potatoes, lentils/beans with fried chicken / beef / pork for the main. It usually comes with a lemonade or a fresh juice.
We eat a “cuy” next to Cusco. It’s a kind of guinea pig and it tastes like rabbit. We had the honour to pick one alive from the breeding and watch all the preparation process from the killing to the plate.
In some parts we heard people saying cats are very tasteful although we’ve never seen it on the menu list…
In touristic places or fancy restaurants you have to try the ceviche, rice with seafood or the cuy. Much more expensive but really worth it!

Ecuador

Entry requirements (Visa)
90 days tourist visa stamped at the border.
Accommodation / Camping
You can find a basic hotel room from 10€ to 20€ almost everywhere.
Because the very dense tropical vegetation, it was generally tricky finding hidden spot to pitch the tent. So we generally stayed on the village square, church or sportsground in small localities and next to the police or firemen stations when they agreed to host us.
Traveling with a dog
It was sometimes hard to find an hotel where dogs are allowed. Most of the motels do accept animals as you can access the room from the parking lot.
We took the bus on two portions and it wasn’t an issue if Iba travels in the hold with the bicycle.
There were no problem to go in and out of the country from Peru and Colombia The guards never asked for the needed exportation permit or health certificate. So no need to follow the complicated and expensive requirements to cross the border with a dog. Save money and time!
Traveling by bike
Roads and secondary dust road are in a good shape even if some secondary roads are very very steeps and couldn’t be ridden with our heavy tandem. We crossed the country during the rainy season so we had to daily race against the storms to find a shelter before getting damp wet. The climate is temperate in the mountains and very hot down in the plains so we alternated between the two playgrounds to get a good balance between steep/cold and flat/hot conditions.
Country / People
Ecuador is a very small country but with a wide variety of landscapes. Steep mountains and volcanoes, tropical forest, Swiss like hills and pacific coast. We alternated between these elements in a very fast pace so it was hard to get bored. We were warmly welcome twice to local homes and felt secure all the way through the country.
Food
Simple but good 2 meal course in countryside for less than 3$ : a stock or stew for starter and some rice, potatoes, lentils/beans with eggs or meat. We got very sick after drinking some milk from the supermarket. Later on we understood milk must be boiled before consuming it.

Colombia

Entry requirements (Visa)
90 days tourist visa stamped at the border.
Accommodation / Camping
You can find a basic hotel room from 10€ to 20€ next to petrol stations or in any urbanization. Because the steep rocky mountains or the tropical vegetation, it was generally tricky finding hidden spot to pitch the tent. The solution was asking the permission to petrol stations or restaurants to set the hammock or the tent on their land for the night. There is usually no problem, especially if you consume at the restaurant.
Traveling with a dog
Depending the area, especially the turistic ones, dogs were not allowed in hotels.
Taking the bus or taxi wasn’t a problem at all.
What was strictly prohibited was entering in national parks like Tayrona’s one. And there were no way to negotiate. It’s always frustrating not being able to go anywhere you want.Travelling with a dog makes you skip the biggest attractions and forces you off track where we found hidden gems.
No problem at the Ecuadorian / Colombian border with Iba. The guards never asked for the needed exportation permit or health certificate. So no need to follow the complicated and expensive requirements to cross the border with a dog. Save money and time!
Traveling by bike
All the roads we cycled were paved and in a very good conditions. But we heard there are plenty of unpaved secondary roads. There were plenty of stone falls and landslides in the mountains next to Pasto and we had to be vigilant all the time to avoid an accident.
We crossed Colombia and equator during the rainy season which wasn’t the easiest thing we have done. The climate is temperate in the mountains and very hot down in the plains what gave use tricky decisions to take: the easy cycle on the terribly hot flat lands or the steep but cooler hills…
Country / People
Food
Eggs and cheese arepas for breakfast (1$), bandera paisa (rice, beans, meat, egg and plantain) with limonade for lunch (3$), fried empanadas or pastry for dinner and a frozen coco whenever you feel dehydrated (0.3$). We had access to prepared food almost all the time in Colombia as we didn’t stay much in the wild overnight so we’ve almost never cooked.

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